Development of High Performance, High Bio Based Content Thermoset Elastomeric Compliant Materials Technology

Renseignements sur le financement
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada
  • Type de subvention: Programme de subventions d'engagement partenariat
  • Année: 2017/18
  • Financement total: $25,000
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Sommaire du projet

PU foams are essential components of an immense range of products. One of the main advantages of using PU foams is the ease of processing/forming the foamed products and large tailor-ability of foam properties through adjustment of micro-configurations. One of the main components of PU foams is the iso-cyanate precursor (reactant) which is not environmentally friendly. Stewart Canada, one of the largest escalator PU foams manufacturer in the world, currently utilizes solid PU foams for supplies a range of industries from footwear to yoga mats and other compliant materials technologies. The current design of PU still relies heavily on the utilization of iso-cyanate. Stewart's goal is to increase bio-content in the PU foams while maintaining required mechanical properties. Besides the positive environmental effects, this is also expected to increase the cost to performance ratio of the products. The goal of the proposed project is to reduce the ammount of iso-cyanate and increase the bio-based content while maintaining the required level of mechanical performance. The foaming process would need to be designed using thermodynamic controls and con-formal filler matrix surface chemistry would need to be developed. Through the combination of academic expertise in the foaming field at the University of Toronto together with one of the Leading PU manufacturers in the world, novel foam and process innovations are envisioned for the Stewart's product portfolio. Along with improvement of the sustainability aspect, this would open opportunities for improvement of the current manufacturing systems which would in turn create more jobs in Canada.