Is there collaboration specific neurophysiological activation during collaborative task activity? An analysis of brain responses using electroencephalography and hyperscanning

Brain and Behavior, Vol. 11 (2021)

Mots clés
Auteurs
  • Paul Léné
  • Département de management HEC Montréal Montréal Quebec Canada
  • Alexander J. Karran
  • Département de technologies de l'information HEC Montréal Montréal Quebec Canada
  • Elise Labonté‐Lemoyne
  • Département de technologies de l'information HEC Montréal Montréal Quebec Canada
  • Sylvain Sénécal
  • Département de technologies de l'information HEC Montréal Montréal Quebec Canada
  • Marc Fredette
  • Département de technologies de l'information HEC Montréal Montréal Quebec Canada
  • Kevin J. Johnson
  • Département de management HEC Montréal Montréal Quebec Canada
  • Pierre‐Majorique Léger
  • Département de technologies de l'information HEC Montréal Montréal Quebec Canada

Résumé

Abstract Collaboration between two individuals is thought to be associated with the synchrony of two different brain activities. Indeed, prefrontal cortical activation and alpha frequency band modulation has been widely reported, but little is known about interbrain synchrony (IBS) changes occurring during social interaction such as collaboration or competition. In this study, we assess the dynamic of IBS variation in order to provide novel insights into the frequency band modulation underlying collaboration. To address this question, we used electroencephalography (EEG) to simultaneously record the brain activity of two individuals playing a computer‐based game facing four different conditions: collaboration, competition, single participation, and passive observation. The computer‐based game consisted of a fast button response task. Using data recorded in sensor space, we calculated an IBS value for each frequency band using both wavelet coherence transform and phase‐locking value and performed single‐subject analysis to compare each condition. We found significant IBS in frontal electrodes only present during collaboration associated with alpha frequency band modulation. In addition, we observed significant IBS in the theta frequency band for both collaboration and competition conditions, along with a significant single‐subject cortical activity. Competition is distinguishable through single‐subject activity in several regions and frequency bands of the brain. Performance is correlated with single‐subject frontal activation during collaboration in the alpha and beta frequency band.

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