Antibiotic-metal complexes in wastewaters: fate and treatment trajectory

Environment International, Vol. 157 (2021)

Mots clés
Auteurs
  • Pratishtha Khurana
  • Department of Civil Engineering, Lassonde School of Engineering, York University, North York, Toronto, Ontario M3J 1P3, Canada
  • Rama Pulicharla
  • Department of Civil Engineering, Lassonde School of Engineering, York University, North York, Toronto, Ontario M3J 1P3, Canada
  • Satinder Kaur Brar
  • Corresponding author.; Department of Civil Engineering, Lassonde School of Engineering, York University, North York, Toronto, Ontario M3J 1P3, Canada

Résumé

Unregulated usage, improper disposal, and leakage from pharmaceutical use and manufacturing sites have led to high detection levels of antibiotic residues in wastewater and surface water. The existing water treatment technologies are insufficient for removing trace antibiotics and these residual antibiotics tend to interact with co-existing metal ions and form antibiotic-metal complexes (AMCs) with altered bioactivity profile and physicochemical properties. Typically, antibiotics, including tetracyclines, fluoroquinolones, and sulphonamides, interact with heavy metals such as Fe2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Ni2+, to form AMCs which are more persistent and toxic than parent compounds. Although many studies have reported antibiotics detection, determination, distribution and risks associated with their environmental persistence, very few investigations are published on understanding the chemistry of these complexes in the wastewater and sludge matrix. This review, therefore, summarizes the structural features of both antibiotics and metals that facilitate complexation in wastewater. Further, this work critically appraises the treatment methods employed for antibiotic removal, individually and combined with metals, highlights the knowledge gaps, and delineates future perspectives for their treatment.

Read more: fulltext