Running Performance of High-Level Soccer Player Positions Induces Significant Muscle Damage and Fatigue Up to 24 h Postgame

Frontiers in Psychology, Vol. 12 (2021)

Mots clés
Auteurs
  • Lucas Albuquerque Freire
  • Department of Fights, Postgraduate Program in Physical Education, School of Physical Education and Sports, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • Michele Andrade de Brito
  • Department of Fights, Postgraduate Program in Physical Education, School of Physical Education and Sports, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • Natã Sant’anna Esteves
  • Department of Fights, Postgraduate Program in Physical Education, School of Physical Education and Sports, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • Márcio Tannure
  • Department of Fights, Postgraduate Program in Physical Education, School of Physical Education and Sports, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • Maamer Slimani
  • Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation, Ophthalmology, Genetics, Maternal and Child Health (DINOGMI), Section of Psychiatry, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy
  • Hela Znazen
  • Department of Physical Education and Sport, College of Education, Taif University, Taif, Saudi Arabia
  • Nicola Luigi Bragazzi
  • Laboratory for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada
  • Ciro José Brito
  • Postgraduate Program in Physical Education, School of Physical Education and Sports, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, Brazil
  • Dany Alexis Sobarzo Soto
  • Escuela de Kinesiología, Facultad de Salud, Universidad Santo Tomás, Santiago, Chile
  • Daniel Gonçalves
  • Department of Fights, Postgraduate Program in Physical Education, School of Physical Education and Sports, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • Bianca Miarka
  • Department of Fights, Postgraduate Program in Physical Education, School of Physical Education and Sports, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Résumé

This study aimed to determine the impact of a soccer game on the creatine kinase (Ck) response and recovery and the specific Global Positioning System (GPS)-accelerometry-derived performance analysis during matches and comparing playing positions. A sample composed of 118 observations of 24 professional soccer teams of the Brazil League Serie A was recruited and classified according to playing positions, i.e., Left/Right Defenders (D = 30, age: 25.2 ± 5.8 years, height: 187 ± 5.5 cm, weight: 80 ± 5.8 kg), Offensive Midfielders (OM = 44, age: 25.1 ± 0.2 years, height: 177 ± 0.3 cm, weight: 73 ± 1.2 kg), Forwards (F = 9, age: 25.1 ± 0.2 years, height: 176.9 ± 4.3 cm, weight: 74.5 ± 2.1 kg), Left/Right Wingers (M = 23, age: 24.5 ± 0.5 years, height: 175 ± 1.1 cm, weight: 74 ± 4.4 kg), and Strikers (S = 12, age: 28 ± 0.2 years, height: 184 ± 1.0 cm, weight: 80 ± 1.4 kg). Blood Ck concentration was measured pre-, immediately post-, and 24 h postgame, and the GPS-accelerometry parameters were assessed during games. Findings demonstrated that Ck concentrations were higher at all postgame moments when compared with pregame, with incomplete recovery markers being identified up to 24 h after the game (range: 402–835 U/L). Moreover, Midfielders (108.6 ± 5.6 m/min) and Forwards (109.1 ± 8.3 m/min) had a higher relative distance vs. other positions (100.9 ± 10.1 m/min). Strikers [8.2 (8.1, 9.05) load/min] and Defenders [8.45 (8, 8.8) load/min] demonstrated lower load/min than Wingers [9.5 (9.2, 9.8) load/min], Midfielders [10.6 (9.9, 11.67) load/min], and Forwards [11 (10.65, 11, 15) load/min]. These results could be used to adopt specific training programs and recovery strategies after match according to the playing positions.

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