Seizure frequency discrepancy between subjective and objective ictal electroencephalography data in dogs

Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Vol. 35 (2021)

Mots clés
Auteurs
  • Masayasu Ukai
  • Ontario Veterinary College University of Guelph Guelph Ontario Canada
  • Thomas Parmentier
  • Ontario Veterinary College University of Guelph Guelph Ontario Canada
  • Miguel A. Cortez
  • Division of Neurology, Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine University of Toronto, Peter Gilgan Center Research Learning, SickKids Research Institute Toronto Ontario Canada
  • Andrea Fischer
  • Centre for Clinical Veterinary Medicine Ludwig‐Maximilians‐Universität München München Germany
  • Luis Gaitero
  • Ontario Veterinary College University of Guelph Guelph Ontario Canada
  • Hannes Lohi
  • Departments of Medical and Clinical Genetics and Veterinary Biosciences University of Helsinki Helsinki Finland
  • Stephanie Nykamp
  • Ontario Veterinary College University of Guelph Guelph Ontario Canada
  • Tarja S. Jokinen
  • Department of Equine and Small Animal Medicine University of Helsinki Helsinki Finland
  • Danielle Powers
  • Neurology and Neurosurgery Service Animal Medical and Surgical Center Scottsdale Arizona USA
  • Veronique Sammut
  • Neurology Department VCA West Los Angeles Animal Hospital Los Angeles California USA
  • Sean Sanders
  • Seattle Veterinary Neurosurgery Seattle Washington USA
  • Tricia Tai
  • Neurology Department VCA West Los Angeles Animal Hospital Los Angeles California USA
  • Franziska Wielaender
  • Centre for Clinical Veterinary Medicine Ludwig‐Maximilians‐Universität München München Germany
  • Fiona James
  • Ontario Veterinary College University of Guelph Guelph Ontario Canada

Résumé

Abstract Background Many studies of epilepsy in veterinary medicine use subjective data (eg, caregiver‐derived histories) to determine seizure frequency. Conversely, in people, objective data from electroencephalography (EEG) are mainly used to diagnose epilepsy, measure seizure frequency and evaluate efficacy of antiseizure drugs. These EEG data minimize the possibility of the underreporting of seizures, a known phenomenon in human epileptology. Objective To evaluate the correlation between reported seizure frequency and EEG frequency of ictal paroxysmal discharges (PDs) and to determine whether seizure underreporting phenomenon exists in veterinary epileptology. Animals Thirty‐three ambulatory video‐EEG recordings in dogs showing ≥1 ictal PD, excluding dogs with status epilepticus. Methods Retrospective observational study. Ictal PDs were counted manually over the entire recording to obtain the frequency of EEG seizures. Caregiver‐reported seizure frequency from the medical record was categorized into weekly, daily, hourly, and per minute seizure groupings. The Spearman rank test was used for correlation analysis. Results The coefficient value (rs) comparing reported seizure to EEG‐confirmed ictal PD frequencies was 0.39 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.048‐0.64, P = .03). Other rs values comparing history against various seizure types were: 0.36 for motor seizures and 0.37 for nonmotor (absence) seizures. Conclusions and Clinical Importance A weak correlation was found between the frequency of reported seizures from caregivers (subjective data) and ictal PDs on EEG (objective data). Subjective data may not be reliable enough to determine true seizure frequency given the discrepancy with EEG‐confirmed seizure frequency. Confirmation of the seizure underreporting phenomenon in dogs by prospective study should be carried out.

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