Experimental warming differentially affects vegetative and reproductive phenology of tundra plants

Nature Communications, Vol. 12 (2021)

Keywords
Authors
  • Courtney G. Collins
  • Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Sarah C. Elmendorf
  • Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Robert D. Hollister
  • Department of Biology, Grand Valley State University
  • Greg H. R. Henry
  • Department of Geography, University of British Columbia
  • Karin Clark
  • Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Government of the Northwest Territories
  • Anne D. Bjorkman
  • Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg
  • Isla H. Myers-Smith
  • School of GeoSciences, The University of Edinburgh
  • Janet S. Prevéy
  • U.S. Geological Survey
  • Isabel W. Ashton
  • National Park Service, Inventory & Monitoring Division
  • Jakob J. Assmann
  • Department of Biology, Aarhus University
  • Juha M. Alatalo
  • Environmental Science Center, Qatar University
  • Michele Carbognani
  • Department of Chemistry, Life Sciences and Environmental Sustainability, University of Parma
  • Chelsea Chisholm
  • Department of Environmental Systems Science, ETH
  • Elisabeth J. Cooper
  • Department of Arctic and Marine Biology, The Arctic University of Norway UiT
  • Chiara Forrester
  • Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Ingibjörg Svala Jónsdóttir
  • Department of Life- and Environmental Sciences, University of Iceland
  • Kari Klanderud
  • Department of Ecology and Natural Resource Management, Norwegian University of Life Sciences
  • Christopher W. Kopp
  • Biodiversity Research Center, University of British Columbia
  • Carolyn Livensperger
  • National Park Service, Capitol Reef National Park
  • Marguerite Mauritz
  • Department of Biological Sciences, University of Texas at El Paso
  • Jeremy L. May
  • Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University
  • Ulf Molau
  • Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg
  • Steven F. Oberbauer
  • Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University
  • Emily Ogburn
  • Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Zoe A. Panchen
  • Department of Geography, University of British Columbia
  • Alessandro Petraglia
  • Department of Chemistry, Life Sciences and Environmental Sustainability, University of Parma
  • Eric Post
  • Department of Wildlife, Fish, & Conservation Biology, University of California Davis
  • Christian Rixen
  • Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL
  • Heidi Rodenhizer
  • Center for Ecosystem Science and Society, Northern Arizona University
  • Edward A. G. Schuur
  • Center for Ecosystem Science and Society, Northern Arizona University
  • Philipp Semenchuk
  • Department of Botany and Biodiversity Research, The University of Vienna
  • Jane G. Smith
  • Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Heidi Steltzer
  • Department of Environment and Sustainability, Fort Lewis College
  • Ørjan Totland
  • Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Bergen
  • Marilyn D. Walker
  • HOMER Energy by UL
  • Jeffrey M. Welker
  • Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Alaska Anchorage
  • Katharine N. Suding
  • Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, University of Colorado Boulder

Abstract

It is unclear whether climate driven phenological shifts of tundra plants are consistent across the plant growing season. Here the authors analyse data from a network of field warming experiments in Arctic and alpine tundra, finding that warming differentially affects the timing and duration of reproductive and vegetative phenology.

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