Species richness and identity both determine the biomass of global reef fish communities

Nature Communications, Vol. 12 (2021)

Keywords
Authors
  • Jonathan S. Lefcheck
  • Tennenbaum Marine Observatories Network and MarineGEO program, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
  • Graham J. Edgar
  • Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania
  • Rick D. Stuart-Smith
  • Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania
  • Amanda E. Bates
  • Department of Ocean Sciences, Memorial University of Newfoundland
  • Conor Waldock
  • Landscape Ecology, Institute of Terrestrial Ecosystems, ETH Zürich
  • Simon J. Brandl
  • Department of Marine Science, The University of Texas at Austin, Marine Science Institute
  • Stuart Kininmonth
  • School of Marine Studies, The University of South Pacific, Laucala Bay Road
  • Scott D. Ling
  • Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania
  • J. Emmett Duffy
  • Tennenbaum Marine Observatories Network and MarineGEO program, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
  • Douglas B. Rasher
  • Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences
  • Aneil F. Agrawal
  • Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto

Abstract

Species identity and richness both contribute biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationships. Here the authors apply a decomposition approach inspired by the Price equation to a global dataset of reef fish community biomass, finding that increased richness and community compositions favouring large-bodied species enhance biomass.

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