Employing Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies as a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prophylactic & Therapeutic Application

Frontiers in Immunology, Vol. 12 (2021)

Keywords
Authors
  • Chengchao Ding
  • The First Affiliated Hospital of USTC, Division of Life Science and Medicine, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China
  • Darshit Patel
  • Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada
  • Yunjing Ma
  • Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada
  • Jamie F. S. Mann
  • Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada
  • Jianjun Wu
  • Department of AIDS Research, Anhui Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Hefei, China
  • Yong Gao
  • The First Affiliated Hospital of USTC, Division of Life Science and Medicine, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China
  • Yong Gao
  • Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada

Abstract

Despite the discovery that the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) is the pathogen of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in 1983, there is still no effective anti-HIV-1 vaccine. The major obstacle to the development of HIV-1 vaccine is the extreme diversity of viral genome sequences. Nonetheless, a number of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) against HIV-1 have been made and identified in this area. Novel strategies based on using these bNAbs as an efficacious preventive and/or therapeutic intervention have been applied in clinical. In this review, we summarize the recent development of bNAbs and its application in HIV-1 acquisition prevention as well as discuss the innovative approaches being used to try to convey protection within individuals at risk and being treated for HIV-1 infection.

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